Dr Celine Goulet

ARC Postdoctoral Research Associate (2017-2019), PhD student (2012-2016)

Celine was a postdoctoral research associate on an ARC Discovery Project investigating behavioural syndromes, and the pace of life syndrome, in the invasive populations of the delicate skink.

Co-supervised by Prof Michael Thompson (University of Sydney)

 

Thesis title: Beyond the behavioural syndrome: functional integration of physiology, behaviour, and cognition among squamate reptiles.

 

For her PhD project, Celine investigated the interaction between thermal biology, behaviour and cognition in the delicate skink.

Dr Kim Miller

ARC Postdoctoral Research Associate, 2010

Kim worked on the invasion dynamics of the delicate skink, and the biology and ecology of the lizard fauna of Lord Howe Island. Kim did her PhD at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand on the maintenance of genetic diversity in re-introduced reptile populations. Kim is now the manager of Life Sciences (Conservation and Research) at Zoos Victoria, based at Healesville Sanctuary.

Dr Katie Date (nee Smith)

Postdoctoral Research Assistant, 2012-2013

Katie did her PhD at the University of Melbourne (with Dr Michael Kearney and Dr Jane Melville) on the evolution and temporal stability of frog hybrid zones. She worked in our lab on a variety of lizard, frog and fish research projects. Katie is now a Collections Manager-Terrestrial Vertebrates at Museums Victoria.

Dr Genevieve Matthews

PhD student, 2016-2020

Co-supervised by Dr Tim Connallon

 

Thesis title: The maintenance of a colour pattern polymorphism with sex-specific fitness consequences in an Australian skink.

 

For her PhD project, Gen investigated colour pattern polymorphism in the delicate skink.

 

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2015-2016

Thesis title: Thermal biology and predation pressure: what is maintaining colour pattern polymorphism in White's skink, Liopholis whitii

 

Gen investigated differences in the thermal biology, behaviour and microhabitat selection between colour morphs of White's skink. 

BIO3990 student, Sem 1, 2015

Gen examined the reflectance of heating/cooling rate in the delicate skink.

Dr Anna Senior

PhD student, 2015-2019

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

 

Thesis title: Ecology and Conservation of Australian squamate reptiles.

 

For her PhD project, Anna investigated the ecology and conservation of three little known skink species from the subfamily Egerniinae: Lissolepis coventryiLiopholis montana, and Liopholis guthega.

Dr Marie Henriksen

PhD Student, 2013-2017

Co-supervised by Assoc Prof Melodie McGeoch & Prof Steven Chown

 

Thesis title: Spatial dissimilarities in a host-parasitoid metaweb: the Acacia-Trichilogaster-natural enemy interaction.

 

Marie investigated spatial variation in the food webs and interaction of Trichilogaster gall wasps and Acacia plants.

Dr Marcus Michelangeli

PhD Student, 2013-2016

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

 

Thesis title: Investigating the syndrome: ecological and evolutionary implications of personality variation.

Marcus' PhD explored the ecological and evolutionary implications of animal personality using a repeatedly successful invasive species, the delicate skink, Lampropholis delicata. He investigated personality variation within broader ecological contexts (ecological sampling; dispersal & competition; thermal variation) and attempted to provide insight into the role animal personality may have played in the delicate skink's successful invasion history.

For more information, visit his website.

Dr Krystina Mossop

PhD Student, 2010-2015

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

 

Thesis title: Fish in the desert: behaviour, genes, and persistence in a changing world.


Krys completed her honours project with Dr Theresa Jones and Prof Mark Elgar at the University of Melbourne. Her broad research interests centre on the ways in which animals interact with a changing environment, particularly within an increasingly anthropogenic world. Her PhD project investigated the behavioural, genetic and morphological implications of environmental change using the desert goby Chlamydogobius eremius, a native species found in the rivers and springs of the Lake Eyre Basin in arid Australia. To do this, she combined field-based ecological surveys with captive, experimental work to examine sexual and movement behaviours. Genetic work (both phylogenetic and phylogeographic) provided an important evolutionary context for these results by providing insights into how a complex biogeographic history and dramatic climatic shifts have shaped the distribution and structure of a modern species. Krys now works for a professional writing company, Mind Your Way.

Dr Will Sowersby

PhD Student, 2012-2015

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

 

Thesis title: Behavioural and morphological variation in neotropical cichlid fishes.

 

Will completed his honours project on the habitat selection of minnows (Galaxias spp.). For his PhD research, Will investigated morphological and behavioural variation in the introduced neotropical Red Devil cichlid fish (Amphilophus labiatus) and several other cichlid species. The study involved both field and laboratory components to investigate the mechanisms that maintain variation in cichlid populations. Will is now a postdoctoral fellow in Sweden. For more information, visit his website.

Dr Lynette Plenderleith

PhD Student, 2010-2015

Co-supervised by Assoc Prof Richard Reina & Prof Jean-Marc Hero (Griffith University)

 

Thesis title: The Ecology of Native Australian Frogs.


Lynette completed her MSc project at Towson University in the US with Dr Don Forester on the spatial and population biology of the northern dusky salamander (Desmognathus fuscus). For her PhD project, Lynette examined the ecology Litoria frogs. Lynette now works as an associate producer for The Chase Australia (Channel 7).

Dr Libby Liggins

Masters Student (First Class Masters), 2005-2007

Co-supervisor: Dr Peter Ritchie (Victoria University of Wellington, NZ) 

Thesis title:
 Phylogeography of the New Zealand common skink species complex, Oligosoma nigriplantare

 

Libby investigated the relative roles of different climatic and geological processes in the evolutionary history of the New Zealand common skink species complex using mitochondrial DNA sequence data (ND2, ND4) and phylogeographic analyses. Libby went on to do a PhD at the University of Queensland and is now a Lecturer in Marine Ecology at Massey University in Auckland.

Jules Farquhar

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2019-2020

Co-supervised by Prof Craig White

Thesis title: The ecophysiological basis of range limits in the delicate skink, Lampropholis delicata.

Jules investigated the ecophysiology of the delicate skink at its western range limit in New South Wales.

Alyse Young

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2019

Thesis title: Impact of environmental population history on the thermal biology of the delicate skink.

For her honours project, Alyse investigated the thermal ecology of the invasive delicate skink on Lord Howe Island.

BIO3990, Sem 1, 2018

For her BIO3990 project, Alyse investigated behavioural differences between colour morphs of the delicate skink.

Claire Walke

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2019

Thesis title: How the gang got away: the role of group composition and geographic isolation in the antipredator behaviour of an invasive lizard.

For her honours project, Claire investigated the antipredator behaviour of the invasive delicate skink on Lord Howe Island.

BIO3990, Sem 1, 2018

Claire examined whether delicate skink colour morphs selected backgrounds that matched their colour patterns

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Intern, 2016-2017

Claire collated data and prepared draft Red List assessments for the IUCN assessments of Australian squamates.

Emma Hinde

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2019

Co-supervised by Dr Reid Tingley, and Prof Shai Meiri (Tel Aviv University)

Thesis title: Do Australian skinks and goannas conform to Bergmann's and Allen's rule?

Emma investigated the factors driving the morphological evolution of Australian skinks and varanids.

Jesca Norris

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2019

Co-supervised by Dr Reid Tingley, and Prof Shai Meiri (Tel Aviv University)

Thesis title: Environmental correlates of morphological diversity in Australian geckos.

Jesca investigated the factors driving morphological evolution in the four families of Australian geckos.

Jaclyn Harris

Honours student (First Class Honorus) , 2018-2019

Thesis title: Is the invasive delicate skink¸ Lampropholis delicata,
competing with native skink species in New Zealand?

For her honours project, Jaclyn investigated the behavioural ecology of the delicate skink.

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Intern, 2016-2017, and BIO3990, Sem 1, 2017

Jaclyn collated data and prepared draft red list assessments in preparation for the IUCN assessments of Australian squamate reptiles held in Perth (Feb 2017) and Monash University (June 2017). In addition, she completed a BIO3990 project examining the impact of human-assisted transportation on the behaviour of the delicate skink, Lampropholis delicata.

Clare Bracey

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2018-2019

Co-supervised by Dr Carly Cook

Thesis title: The influence of revegetation age and habitat on reptiles.

For her honours project, Clare investigated the importance of woody debris for reptile communities in revegetated habitats within the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management area.

Chelsea Smith

Honours student (First Class Honours) , 2018-2019

Thesis title: Is there niche overlap between the invasive delicate skink (Lampropholis delicata) and native New Zealand skinks?

For her honours project, Chelsea examined the behavioural ecology of the delicate skink.

BIO3990, Sem 1, 2016

Chelsea investigated the presence of behavioural syndromes in the garden skink, Lampropholis guichenoti.

Mahalia Barter

Honours student, 2018

Co-supervised by Prof Shai Meiri (Tel Aviv University)

For her honours project, Mahalia compared the macroecology of widespread vs range-restricted Australian skinks.

Luke Bonifacio

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2018

Co-supervised by Prof Shai Meiri (Tel Aviv University)

Thesis title: What predicts the extinction risk of Australian skinks?

For his honours project, Luke compared the macroecology of Australian skinks between categories of the IUCN Red List.

Katelyn Hamilton

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2017-2018

Thesis title: Skink community structure across an elevational gradient in the Australian Alps.


Kate investigated the community ecology of lizards across an elevational gradient in the Australian alpine region.

BIO3990, Sem 1, 2017

For her BIO3990 project, Kate examined the behavioural interactions between geographically isolated populations of the delicate skink.

 

Emily Drummond

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2017-2018

Thesis title: Seasonal thermal plasticity in White's skink, Liopholis whitii.

 

For her honours project, Emily investigated how the thermal tolerances of high elevation Liopholis whitii change across their active season. Her study provides insight into the potential for thermal plasticity within L. whitii in response to increased warming and climatic variability in alpine regions. 

 

BIO3990, Sem 1, 2016

Emily examined the presence of behavioural syndromes in the rainforest sunskinkLampropholis coggeri.

 

She is now working for Prensa Consultants.

Kali Buchholz

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2017

Thesis title: The repeatability of behaviour and stability of behavioural syndromes over short- to medium-term time frames.

 

For her honours project, Kali examined the repeatability of behaviour in the delicate skink, Lampropholis delicata.

BIO3990, Sem 2, 2016

Kali investigated whether thermal types were present in the rainforest sunskink, Lampropholis coggeri. Kali completed honours in the lab group in 2017.

Jessie Beaty

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2016-2017

Co-supervised by Prof Shai Meiri, Tel Aviv University

 

Thesis title: Is the environment a driver of morphological diversity in Australian skinks?

 

Jessie investigated morphological diversification and the macroecology of Australian skinks.

Melissa Farrelly

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2016

Co-supervised by Prof Shai Meiri, Tel Aviv University

 

Thesis title: “A Tail of Loss”. An investigation of mechanisms driving caudal autotomy patterns in squamates.

 

For her honours project, Melissa used a macroecological approach to investigate the factors responsible for the secondary loss of caudal autotomy in squamates, and what drives the frequency of tail loss both within and among species. Mel is now an education officer at the Melbourne aquarium.

Wes Hart

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2016

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

 

 

Thesis title: Differences in behaviours and behavioural syndromes between the sexes in Lampropholis coggeri.

 

For his honours, Wes examined whether there were sexual differences in behavioural syndromes in the rainforest sunskinkLampropholis coggeri.

Fiona Kang

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2015

Thesis title: The impact of urbanisation on the learning ability in the delicate skink, Lampropholis delicata.

 

Fiona examined the impact of urbanisation on cognition and learning in the delicate skink.

BIO3990 student, Sem 1, 2014

Fiona compared the exploratory behaviour of the delicate skink between urban and natural regions of Sydney. Fiona went on to do honours in the research group.

Melinda Chung

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2015

Thesis title: The way you think: the influence of personality on learning in the delicate skink (Lampropholis delicata).

 

Melinda examined the link between personality and cognition in the delicate skink  

Daniel Littlewood

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2014-2015

Thesis title: The more the merrier? Group size effects in an invasive lizard, Lampropholis delicata.

 

For his honours project, Dan investigated the Allee effect in the invasive delicate skink. Dan examined how a range of behaviours associated with invasion success (activity, exploratory behaviour, boldness, antipredator behaviour) varied in relation to group size. Dan now works for the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP).

Shannon Walsh

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2014-2015

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

 

Thesis title: The impact of urbanisation on the responses to novelty and antipredator behaviour in the delicate skink, Lampropholis delicata

 

Shannon compared urban and non-urban populations of the delicate skink from the Sydney region to examine whether urban populations are bolder and are more likely to respond to novelty. Shannon now works for the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP).

Brooke Melki-Wegner

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2014-2015

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

Thesis title: The interaction between tail loss, personality and behaviour in the delicate skink, Lampropholis delicata.

 

For her honours project, Brooke investigated the impact of tail loss (both complete and partial tail loss) on the behaviour of the delicate skink, using a behavioural syndromes approach. Brooke is now a registered nurse. 

Jack Eades

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2013-2014

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

 

Thesis title: Sex differences in the behaviour of the eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki.

 

Jack investigated sexual differences in behaviour in the mosquitofish, focusing on repeatability of behaviours and behavioural syndromes. He found that there were differences in the repeatability of behaviours related to invasion success, and that correlations between behaviours were present. Sex differences in behaviour were also detected. Jack is now working at a bank.

Hannah Moule

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2013-2014

Thesis title: The impacts of urbanisation on the behaviour of the delicate skink, Lampropholis delicata.

 

For her honours project, Hannah investigated the impacts of urbanisation on the behaviour and morphology of the delicate skink in the Sydney region, focusing on behavioural syndromes. She found differences in the behaviour of lizards from urban and natural populations and demonstrated the presence of a behavioural syndrome in the delicate skink. Hannah now works at the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning.

BIO3990 student, Sem 1, 2012

Hannah used mitochondrial DNA sequence data to examine the introduction history and spread of the invasive delicate skink (Lampropholis delicata) across Lord Howe Island.

Dr Kirilee Chaplin

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2012-2013

Thesis title: Intra-specific hybridisation of the delicate skink (Lampropholis delicata) on Lord Howe Island. 

 

Kirilee used mitochondrial DNA sequence data and microsatellite markers to determine the introduction history of the invasive delicate skink, and demonstrate that intra-specific hybridisation is occurring on Lord Howe Island among four genetically distinct lineages. Kirilee completed a PhD at Museums Victoria/University of Melbourne studying agamid lizards.

Dr Louise Barnett

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2011-2012

Thesis title: Impact of invasive rats and delicate skinks on the behaviour of the Lord Howe Island skink, Oligosoma lichenigerum.

 

Louise examined the impact of introduced rats on the behaviour of the Lord Howe Island skink (Oligosoma lichenigerum). Her project involved fieldwork and laboratory experiments on Lord Howe Island. Louise did her PhD at James Cook University, researching the invasion of Asian house geckos in natural environments. She then completed a short postdoc at Flinders University using capture-mark-recapture data to assess the effect of biological control viruses on rabbit survival.

Gillian Cromie

Honours Student (First Class Honours), 2010-2011

Thesis title: The behaviour and response to tail loss in two sympatric Lampropholis skinks.

 

Gill completed a series of laboratory experiments to investigate the thermal sensitivity of sprint speed, activity and basking site selection of Lampropholis delicata and L. guichenoti. In addition, Gill compared the impact of tail loss on the behaviour of these two sympatric species. Gill was an environmental consultant for several years and is now training to be a nurse.

Laura Simsen

Honours Student, 2010

Co-supervised by Dr Kirsti Abbott


Thesis title: Population dynamics of the overwintering Argentine ant: A global invasive species. 

Laura's project provided the first detailed information on the behaviour and ecology of the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) during winter in Melbourne. The insights gained during her project may aid management of this species in the region. Laura is now a high school science teacher.

Sarah Simmonds

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2009-2010

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

 

Thesis title: Influence of social and exploratory behaviour on introduction success: a comparison of two sympatric skinks, Lampropholis delicata and Lampropholis guichenoti

Sarah conducted several laboratory experiments to examine the social and exploratory behaviour of the delicate skink (Lampropholis delicata) and the garden skink (L.
guichenoti). Several behavioural differences were identified that might act to improve the success of the delicate skink during the introduction process. Sarah is currently working as a science communicator at Questacon in Canberra.

Zac Billingham

Honours student (First Class Honours), 2007-2008

Co-supervised by Prof Bob Wong

Thesis title: Grouping habits of a sub-social insect, the Australian wood-boring cockroach, Panesthia australis

For his honours project, Zac experimentally tested the importance of chemical cues in the association preferences of a sub-social cockroach species (Panesthia australis). Zac is now an aquatic ecologist for GHD consultants.

Claire Tingate

BIO3990 student (Sem 1, 2019)

For her BIO3990 project, Claire examined the behavioural and evolutionary ecology of the delicate skink.

Emily Jarvis

BIO3990 student (Sem 1, 2019)

For her BIO3990 project, Emily investigated the behavioural and evolutionary ecology of the delicate skink.

Andrew Todd Weckmann

BIO3990, Sem 2, 2018

For his BIO3990 project, Andrew examined the influence of colour pattern polymorphism on social behaviour in the delicate skink.

Kate Waller

BIO3990 student, Sem 2, 2012

Kate investigated the population genetics of the Lord Howe Island skink (Oligosoma lichenigerum) using mitochondrial DNA sequence data.

Emily Smith

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) intern, 2018-2019.

Emily collated data and prepared draft red list assessments for the IUCN assessment of Australian Proteaceae that was held at Monash University in February 2019.

Claire MacKay

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) intern, 2018-2019.

Claire collated data and prepared draft red list assessments for the IUCN assessment of Australian Proteaceae that was held at Monash University in February 2019.

Jenna Barker

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Intern, 2018

Jenna collated data and prepared draft red list assessments for the IUCN assessment of New Zealand reptiles that was held at Monash in Feb 2018.

Please reload

Chapple Lab Hall of Fame